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Song Of The Week | Oct 16, 2017

The Barr Brothers – It Came To Me

The Barr Brothers, Brothers Andrew and Brad Barr had spent most of the 90s criss-crossing North America, playing music with their spirited, improv-based rock trio, The Slip. In the spring of 2004, the band was playing a small club in Montreal, QC when a fire broke out in the venue. They grabbed a few guitars/drums and rushed out onto the rainy street with the rest of the concert goers. As the club’s mezzanine was swallowed by flames, Andrew offered his coat to one of the waitresses from the bar.

One year later, Brad and Andrew Barr were living in Montreal. That waitress is now one of their managers. In his first apartment in the new city, Brad shared an adjoining wall with Sarah Page, a classically trained harpist from Montreal, whose melodies would seep through the cracks of the wall and into the music Brad was writing. From this nebulous relationship, a friendship developed and the brothers, with Sarah, began recording and performing around Montreal. Soon, their friend and multi-instrumentalist Andres Vial was brought in to lend his wide array of expertise to the outfit, playing keyboards, bass, vibes, percussion, and singing. They called themselves The Barr Brothers.

facebook.com/pg/thebarrbrothers/
thebarrbrothers.com/

 

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Song Of The Week | Oct 09, 2017

Animal Years – Caroline

The unpretentious attitude and hard-driving work ethic that define Animal Years were established early on, when Mike McFadden first began writing and performing his own songs in his mid-teens, releasing his first studio CD under his own name while still in high school in Baltimore.  “Before I moved to New York, I did another solo album, The Sun Will Rise. At that point, Anthony the bass player suggested that we find a drummer and make it into a band, so we rebranded the CD as an Animal Years release. “It became a real band really quickly,” McFadden reports. “When we started the band, we were all working jobs to raise money to make it happen, so we could afford to go on the road and into the studio. The guys started taking an equal part of the work, and everybody started contributing. It took some getting used to, but it was good not being alone and not having to do everything myself. The songwriting is still the same, because that’s still me, but everyone’s invested in this partnership and we’re all getting something out of it.”

facebook.com/AnimalYears
animalyearsmusic.com/

Animal Years is one of the bands playing at the Food Truck Fest that we’re sponsoring this week.  Check out details here

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Song Of The Week | Oct 02, 2017

Dhani Harrison – All About Waiting

Grammy Award winner Dhani Harrison has been busy since the release of his last album with his collective thenewno2. In the past four years Harrison has scored a handful of feature films, marking his big screen debut as a composer on Warner Bros.‘s Beautiful Creatures, which the LA Times praised for its “cool alt-rock sound thanks to the haunting music of Harrison”, as well as Sir Ben Kingsley’s critically acclaimed Learning to Drive. Harrison also found the time to score four TV series including Tony Goldwyn and Richard LaGravenese’s The Divide, two seasons of the Paul Giamatti executive produced show Outsiders, Showtime’s White Famous and Amazon’s original series, Good Girls Revolt.

In addition, Harrison has collaborated with an eclectic array of musicians and like-minded artists such as The Wu-Tang Clan, Regina Spektor, Pearl Jam, UNKLE, Ben Harper and Prince.
Echoing his influences over the past few years as a composer, Harrison’s IN///PARALLEL paints a cinematic soundscape, with his first solo album coming out on October 6.

https://www.facebook.com/DhaniHarrisonOfficial/
http://www.dhaniharrison.com/

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Song Of The Week | Sep 25, 2017

David Ramirez – Watching from A Distance

Prolific singer and songwriter David Ramirez has earned a large and growing following for his soulful, introspective songs and passionate performances. Ramirez grew up in Houston TX, where he became interested in music and formed a band with his friends.

Influenced by ’90s alternative rock, Ramirez’s group primarily played parties, but he got hooked on making music, and while attending college in Dallas, he heard an album by Ryan Adams and became fascinated by contemporary folk and influential singer/songwriters of the ’60s and ’70s, especially Bob Dylan.

 

facebook.com/pg/davidramirezaustin
davidramirezmusic.com

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Song Of The Week | Sep 18, 2017

Ted Leo – Can’t Go Back

Ted Leo is one of the finest songwriters of our generation, even if it’s not entirely clear what generation that is. Starting in New York Hardcore with Citizen’s Arrest, making the ‘90s safe for power-pop and Weller-esque hair with Chisel, then singing our turbulent lives like we were smarter than we were with The Pharmacists, and most recently providing equal parts sweetness and solace with Aimee Mann as The Both, Ted never let us down. And now, seven years after The Brutalist Bricks, he has a new solo album. And it’s wonderful.

The songs on The Hanged Man, recorded at a home-studio-in-transition in Wakefield, RI, with Ted playing almost all the instruments, are some of the finest and most finely wrought of Ted Leo’s career. Ted describes the time working on the album as one of “personal desolation that felt fallow but was actually very fertile” and, indeed, lyrically, The Hanged Man is suffused with hope of sorts but is crushingly heavy. The concerns addressed, whether personal trauma or the national disaster we’re all currently existing in, matched with the range and vitality of the songcraft, is inspiring, even uplifting.

The Hanged Man offers the sharp bursts of skinny-tie pop-punk fury one would expect from Ted—and even these feel streamlined like never before—but they are offset with an adventurousness in both tone and structure. The intention was to upend expectations but, on songs like the bookends of “Moon Out of Phase” and “Let’s Stay On The Moon,” the intention never gets in the way of the result. There’s no strain of effort in songs that are unlike anything Ted has done previously. The Hanged Man is a career high, born through industry soul sickness, nausea-inducing crisis, and a talent that feels like secular grace.

facebook.com/TedLeo/
www.tedleo.com

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