:::: MENU ::::

Posts Categorized / Song Of The Week

Song Of The Week | Jan 26, 2015

Jubilee Riots – Trying Times

jubileeriots
Under their former name, Enter The Haggis, the band released seven studio albums and toured internationally, landing high profile gigs on “Live with Regis and Kelly” and A&E’s “Breakfast with the Arts,” as well as being the feature of a concert/documentary on PBS.

“We toured and recorded as Enter The Haggis for a long time, but that name no longer represents the music that we’re making,” says the band’s multi-instrumentalist, Craig Downie.

With a new album and new name the band hopes to build on this legacy, and with the release of Penny Black they’ve got an extensive tour lined up through Canada, the US, and Europe.

Check out the tour schedule and see if you can’t make it to a show: if there’s one thing to take away from this, after all, it’s that Jubilee Riots is more than just a band and their eclectic, eccentric music. They’re a group of people who want to bring a community together doing what they love most—and with the momentum from Penny Black, that community is only going to grow.
JubileeRiots.com
Facebook.com/jubileeriotsband

[DOWNLOAD NOW] (To download on PC- Right Click -> “Save As”, on a MAC CTRL -> “Save As”)

Song Of The Week | Jan 19, 2015

Victor Krummenacher – Chemtrails

victorkrummenacherVictor Krummenacher, the San Francisco-based co-founder of indie rock icons Camper Van Beethoven, has taken time away from the still very active band (two albums and tours in the last year and a half) in order to record a solo album titled Hard To See Trouble Coming.

Set for release in early January, the collection of ten original songs highlights his love of the blues, country rock and folk traditions. Co-Produced by Victor and renowned pedal steel player/long-time collaborator Bruce Kaplan (of American Music Club), Hard To See Trouble Coming showcases Krummenacher in the role of pensive lead singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist venturing beyond the bass and for the first time in his long and distinguished solo career, playing guitar—Fender Strat, Martin D18 & Jazzmaster—throughout. The songs are a vivid distillation of decades of artistry—from the freewheeling CVB punk aesthetic to a Gram Parsons-like exploration of “cosmic country.”

[DOWNLOAD NOW] (To download on PC- Right Click -> “Save As”, on a MAC CTRL -> “Save As”)

victorkrummenacher.com
facebook.com/victor.krummenacher

Song Of The Week | Jan 12, 2015

Son Little – The River

Son LittleYou know that old saying about how people who truly live full lives forget more than most of us will ever learn? Son Little knows that feeling. So he writes to remember. “I was always a writer,” says the man formerly known as Aaron Livingston. “Before I really learned music, I was serious about writing. Didn’t matter what it was. Just playing with words.” Considering how long he’s been making music, that’s saying something. Born in Los Angeles to a preacher and a teacher, as a kid he absorbed songs from dusty family records and learned saxophone and piano, though he felt more at home inventing his own language on those instruments rather than following the lesson plan. Adapt or die, as they say. Cycling through jazz, rock and R&B history, the hungry young son was beginning his true education. A few years later, the Livingstons moved to Queens, introducing Aaron to the active arts of hip-hop, basketball and city life. High school in suburban Jersey left him wanting more, so he headed to Manhattan and Columbia University, where he discovered art, recreational substances, and girls, girls, girls. He dropped out, got a job, got sad, kept journals. He moved to Philly, enrolled at Temple University, met the legendary Roots crew, even played music with them; they put his voice on an album, “undun”. He had a daughter, then a son. He was happy, still writing all the while. https://www.facebook.com/SonLittleMusic http://www.anti.com/artists/son-little/

[DOWNLOAD NOW] (To download on PC- Right Click -> “Save As”, on a MAC CTRL -> “Save As”)

Song Of The Week | Jan 05, 2015

Lucinda Williams – Protection

lucinda-williams-1024x685She recorded her first albums in 1978 and 1980 in a traditional country and blues style and received very little attention from radio, the media, or the public. In 1988, she released her self-titled album, Lucinda Williams. This release featured “Passionate Kisses”, a song later recorded by Mary Chapin Carpenter, which garnered Williams her first Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1994.
Known for working slowly, Williams recorded and released only one other album in the next several years (Sweet Old World in 1992) before her greatest success came in 1998 with Car Wheels on a Gravel Road, an album presenting a broader scope of songs that fused rock, blues, country, and Americana into a more distinctive style that still managed to remain consistent and commercial in sound. It went gold and earned Williams another Grammy while being universally acclaimed by critics. Since Car Wheels on a Gravel Road, she has released a string of albums that have also been critically acclaimed, though none have sold in the numbers of her 1998 breakthrough. She was also named “America’s best songwriter” by TIME magazine in 2002.
Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone is Lucinda Williams’ eleventh studio album. The double album was released in 2014. It is the first album on Williams’ own Highway 20 Records label.

http://lucindawilliams.com
https://www.facebook.com/LucindaWilliams

[DOWNLOAD NOW] (To download on PC- Right Click -> “Save As”, on a MAC CTRL -> “Save As”)

Song Of The Week | Dec 29, 2014

Bruce Cockburn – Waterwalker

bruce-cockburn-pc-kevin-kelly-2Bruce Cockburn has always been a restless spirit. Over the course of four decades, the celebrated Canadian artist has traveled to the corners of the earth out of humanitarian concerns—often to trouble spots experiencing events that have led to some of his most memorable songs. Going up against chaos, even if it involves grave risks, can be necessary to get closer to the truth.

“My mother once said that I must have a death wish, always going to what she called ‘those awful places,’” laughs Cockburn. “I don’t think of it that way. I make these trips partly because I want to see things for myself and partly out of my own sense of adventure.”

Rumours Of Glory, the long–awaited memoir from legendary singer–songwriter Bruce Cockburn, is published by Harper One in the U.S. and HarperCollinsCanada.
Best known for his memorable songs including “Pacing The Cage” (1995), “If A Tree Falls” (1988), “If I Had A Rocket Launcher” (1984), “Lovers In A Dangerous Time” (1984) and “Wondering Where The Lions Are” (1979), the award–winning songwriter and pioneering guitarist — whose life and music has been shaped by politics, protest, romance and spiritual discovery — has released 31 albums spanning five decades.
Rumours Of Glory is also the title of a box set collection curated by Cockburn himself as a companion piece to his memoir; the songs are presented in the same order they appear in the book. This limited edition 117–song, 9–disc set includes 16 rare and previously unreleased songs and a live concert DVD — the artist’s only full–length concert video.
Each box set is autographed, sequentially numbered and includes a 90–page book featuring rare photos, extensive track information and new liner notes written by Nicholas Jennings. Don’t miss this truly unique collection by an incomparable Canadian icon.

http://brucecockburn.com
https://www.facebook.com/officialbrucecockburn

[DOWNLOAD NOW] (To download on PC- Right Click -> “Save As”, on a MAC CTRL -> “Save As”)

Pages:1234567